42 results for author: ssquires


February 18th and 19th

On February 18, 1836, Narcissa Prentiss and Marcus Whitman were married. Within days of their marriage they would begin the journey that took them west to a new home and a new life.Her wedding dress was her best dress, a black bombazine in black. In those days black was a suitable color for weddings. On the morning of Friday, February 19, Narcissa and Marcus left Angelica, NY for Ithaca. She was embarking on a new adventure with a husband she barely knew. How would you have felt? Leaving your family on a journey that many said was impossible for a woman, perhaps never to see any of them again. The distance from Angelica to Ithaca is about one ...

February 28th

On Sunday, February 28, Marcus and Narcissa and the Nez Perce boys were in Rushville, visiting his mother, Mrs. Calvin Loomis, and other relatives. Narcissa wrote, "I had made for me in Brother Augustus' shoe store in Rushville, a pair of gentlemen's shoes and from him we supplied ourselves with what shoes we wanted." She apparently felt that no shoes normally worn by a woman would be suitable for the trip. Traveling by sleigh, they left Rushville on Thursday, March 3, heading to Pittsburgh by way of Elmira, NY and Williamsport and Holidaysville, PA. Perhaps they took what is now route 14, a scenic, winding road, 72 miles to Williamsport ...

The Beginning

Born today in 1808 to Stephen and Clarissa (Ward) Prentiss in a small town named Prattsburgh. Narcissa Prentiss. She was the third child of nine and the eldest daughter. Being the eldest daughter, Narcissa helped with the upbringing of her younger brothers and sisters. At a revival in 1819, Narcissa Prentiss, at the very young age of 11, had a conversion experience and was received as a member of the Congregational Church. Narcissa read about and was inspired by the life of Harriet Boardman, an American Board of Commissioners of Foreign Missions (ABCFM) missionary to India. At age 16, she decided she wanted to become a missionary. The stretches of ...

March 14th

Narcissa spent her 28th birthday, March 14, in Pittsburgh, having spent the previous day in bed with a headache at the Exchange Hotel, while Marcus attended the East Liberty Presbyterian Church with the 2 Nez Perce boys. Tuesday morning, March 16, they left Pittsburgh on the steamboat Siam. Narcissa wrote her mother: "It is delightful passing so rapidly down the waters of this beautiful river. The motion of the boat is very agreeable to me, except while writing, Our accommodations are good; we occupy a stateroom where we can be as retired as we wish." The Siam steamed down the Ohio River to Cincinnati, arriving at noon on Wednesday, March 17. H...

March 28th

From: The Letters and Journals of Narcissa Whitman. March 28.- We have just come on board the Majestic. It is rightly named, for it is one of the largest boats on the river. We are now sailing on the waters of the great Mississippi. When I commenced this sheet we had just left Pittsburgh. We arrived in Cincinnati Thursday noon. Found Brother Spalding. Said he had been waiting for us anxiously for a fortnight; spent the remainder of the week in making arrangements for our journey, and on the Sabbath had a very interesting time with the disciples of Jesus there; felt strengthened and comforted as we left them, to pursue our journey into the wilder...

March 29th

The party arrived in Saint Louis, MO on Tuesday afternoon, March 29. Narcissa wrote, "Husband has been to the post office expecting to find letters from dear, dear friends at home but finds none. Why have they not written, seeing it is the very last, last time they will have to cheer my heart with intelligence from home, home, sweet home, and the friends I love. But I am not sad. My health is good. My mind completely occupied with present duty and passing events." However, Marcus did receive the official passport from the War Department, Office of Indian Affairs, appointing Marcus and Henry to be missionaries and teachers to reside in the Indian ...

March 28th

As the team prepares for the rest of the trip mostly by land we take one more look at Narcissa's thought from the river. Learn more about the paths the steamboats took during that time period. "Can scarcely resist the temptation to stand out to view the shores of the majestic river," she wrote in her diary as the boat approached St. Louis. "Varied scenes present themselves as we pass up - beautiful landscapes - on the one side high and rugged bluffs, and on the other low plains" (March 28, 1836). She was in good spirits. "I think I shall endure the journey well - perhaps better than any of the rest of us" (April 7, 1836). Learn more about ...

April 7th

Having arrived at their halfway point, Liberty, MO, on April 7 and ended the portion of the trip on water, the Whitman’s and Spaldings took some time to purchase equipment and supplies for their journey. Marcus and Henry bought a heavy farm wagon and quite a few animals, including twelve horses, six mules and seventeen cattle of which four were milk cows. Narcissa described a tent she and Eliza created while staying in Liberty: “made of bed ticking in conical form, large enough for us all to sleep under, vis. Mr. Spalding and wife, Dr. Whitman and wife, Mr. Gray, Richard Takahtoo-ah-tis and John Ais – quite a little family, raised with a center ...

April 19th

On April 19th a single man, William Henry Gray , unexpectedly arrived with an appointment from the American Board to join the Wihtman-Spalding party as a mechanic. Shortly after the mission company got started, a red haired, 19 year old youth named Miles Goodyear attached himself to the party until Fort Hall in Idaho. Miles Morris Goodyear (2-24-17 to 11-12-49) After leaving the party he spent the next decade as a free trapper. In 1839 he married Pomona, daughter of Ute Chirf Pe-teet-neet. The couple had two children. Read more about him here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_Goodyear

April 27th

Henry Spalding left Liberty on Wednesday, April 27, with two supply wagons and the animals headed for the Oto Agency Mission on the north bank of the Platte River. Marcus had arranged for the Satterlees, Allis’, Eliza, Narcissa and himself to be taken the 300 miles to the Oto Agency on the American Fur Company’s boat, Diana. They were to be picked up on Sunday, May 1. On Saturday, April 30 Martha Satterlee died. She had been sick since she and her husband had left Ithaca prior to joining the Whitmans in Williamsport, PA. The Satterlees and Allis’ were to travel with the party only as far as the Pawnee Indian mission.